A lost little Sputnik

Ask   This Tumblelog is for reblogging purposes only.

artandscholarship:

The origin of the blog’s icon (in the bottom left corner): Haeckel, Ernst - “Discomedusae. Scheibenquallen.”

"For Haeckel, the illustration is not a depiction of existing knowledge, but is itself the acquisition of knowledge of nature. The truths of nature are seen. Accordingly, Haeckel’s "Art Forms in Nature" is not merely a set of examples, which with each detail reveals part of the whole. It demonstrates naturalness itself. (…) Knowledge of nature is "natural aesthetics." Accordingly, aesthetics are nothing more than reflections of nature itself. Nature, which develops out of and into itself, is "beautiful." (…)
Consequently, the pages of “Art Forms in Nature” took on a further dimension for Haeckel. The fact that the illustrations are “aesthetic,” beautiful, and that this beauty is found in the smallest facets of nature—such as unicellular organisms or in the medusae of the deep sea—demonstrated to Haeckel that one finds in the smallest living things what distinguishes, or what at least should distinguish, humans in their judgements: “spirit.” The beauty of these minuscule creatures revealed to him the natural quality of one of the largest forms of life—human beings. Hacekel maintained that to be part of nature is to be an element in and the result of the evolutionary process. Accordingly, the phylogeny of forms is simultaneously the phylogeny of the spirit.”
- Breidbach, Olaf. “Brief Instructions to Viewing Haeckel’s Pictures.” From the 2008 reprinting and compiling of Haeckel’s “Art Forms in Nature,” originally published between 1899 and 1904.

artandscholarship:

The origin of the blog’s icon (in the bottom left corner): Haeckel, Ernst - “Discomedusae. Scheibenquallen.”

"For Haeckel, the illustration is not a depiction of existing knowledge, but is itself the acquisition of knowledge of nature. The truths of nature are seen. Accordingly, Haeckel’s "Art Forms in Nature" is not merely a set of examples, which with each detail reveals part of the whole. It demonstrates naturalness itself. (…) Knowledge of nature is "natural aesthetics." Accordingly, aesthetics are nothing more than reflections of nature itself. Nature, which develops out of and into itself, is "beautiful." (…)

Consequently, the pages of “Art Forms in Nature” took on a further dimension for Haeckel. The fact that the illustrations are “aesthetic,” beautiful, and that this beauty is found in the smallest facets of nature—such as unicellular organisms or in the medusae of the deep sea—demonstrated to Haeckel that one finds in the smallest living things what distinguishes, or what at least should distinguish, humans in their judgements: “spirit.” The beauty of these minuscule creatures revealed to him the natural quality of one of the largest forms of life—human beings. Hacekel maintained that to be part of nature is to be an element in and the result of the evolutionary process. Accordingly, the phylogeny of forms is simultaneously the phylogeny of the spirit.”

- Breidbach, Olaf. “Brief Instructions to Viewing Haeckel’s Pictures.” From the 2008 reprinting and compiling of Haeckel’s “Art Forms in Nature,” originally published between 1899 and 1904.

(via gabrielalegre)

— 1 day ago with 490 notes

artandcetera:

Bence Bakonyi, Dignity

Me? I cannot escape from the fact that I struggle with myself, 
how I own my body and my soul at the same time. 
It has always been a difficult question for me: do I know him? Who is he anyway?
It’s so alluring, sometimes as if the will of the body would want to swallow me,
leaving my thoughts behind, but then comes the soul to pull me back.
It’s an eternal battle and a game. Like the gravitational pull of a black hole, 
when it touches you, something new is born, as if I’m not me anymore,
 somewhere else, in an unknown place.

(via stills0und)

— 2 days ago with 100 notes
"

At the end of each day, I write an “atomic sentence,” a single statement that summarizes the most vital lesson about that day.

At times where I flail, fumble, and otherwise seek a signpost, these sentences have helped — personal lifelines indicating a larger story. Each day, an atomic unit in a living network.

"
I love Liz Danzico's idea of ending each day with an “atomic sentence,” inspired by Richard Feynman’s one sentence to be passed on to the next generation.  (via explore-blog)
— 2 days ago with 440 notes
humansofnewyork:

"I’ll do this until something better comes along. Then I’ll do that."
(Kotla, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ll do this until something better comes along. Then I’ll do that."

(Kotla, India)

— 2 days ago with 1401 notes
annmakes:

a very very very small sneek peek of a thing that I hope turns out well.

annmakes:

a very very very small sneek peek of a thing that I hope turns out well.

— 3 days ago with 156 notes
gabrielalegre:

animalaspects:

animalaspects:

Here are some wonderful facts about Sea World’s orcas!
The average lifespan of wild orcas ranges from 30-50 years, although some females can easily make it past 80 (a wild orca named J2 or ‘Granny’ is 103 this year!). The lifespan of a Sea World orca is around 25 years, the median age being 9. But at least they put on a good show!
Don’t worry, collapsed dorsal fins are a common condition, although in the wild only sick or injured orcas have collapsed dorsal fins. All of Sea World’s males and some females have it, it makes them look unique! 
The size of Sea World’s tanks compared to an orca is about the same as a human to a bathtub. Lot’s of room to stretch and move!
Wild orcas swim 100+ miles a day, they would have to swim around their tank 1,400+ times a day to achieve that. But that seems like a lot of work, and you may see the animals hanging out near the surface of the water or on the bottoms of their tanks for hours. That’s a lot more relaxing than swimming all those miles!
Sea World gives their orcas a Valium-like drug to stop the whales from acting aggressively towards each other and to numb their minds from their vastly uninteresting concrete tanks. Buying a ticket to Sea World is an excellent way to help them pay for these drugs that they pump their animals full with!
Many captive orcas show abnormal behaviors like head bobbing, chewing on concrete, and self mutilation by banging their heads into the side of the tank. Obviously just temper-tantrums! Silly things.
In the wild, there has been only one orca attack. Bad orca! While in captivity, there have been over 100 attacks and 4 deaths. These animals just need more training, it couldn’t possibly be related to their confinement! 
Food is used as reinforcement for tricks. Do a trick, get your dinner. Don’t want to do a trick? I guess you don’t eat tonight you stubborn thing! 
See? Sea World isn’t as bad as people make it out to be! Oh, one more fact: for every $1,000,000 Sea World makes, about $600 goes into conservation efforts (about $0.5 a ticket). I’m so glad they care about conservation of the ocean! Amazing work!
Sources: (x) (x) (x) (x)
If you haven’t realized it yet, this post is 100% sarcastic. It should be obvious, but not everyone understands sarcasm…

Please don’t let this die


Tangina Seaworld / Ocean Adventure / Ocean Park

gabrielalegre:

animalaspects:

animalaspects:

Here are some wonderful facts about Sea World’s orcas!

  • The average lifespan of wild orcas ranges from 30-50 years, although some females can easily make it past 80 (a wild orca named J2 or ‘Granny’ is 103 this year!). The lifespan of a Sea World orca is around 25 years, the median age being 9. But at least they put on a good show!
  • Don’t worry, collapsed dorsal fins are a common condition, although in the wild only sick or injured orcas have collapsed dorsal fins. All of Sea World’s males and some females have it, it makes them look unique! 
  • The size of Sea World’s tanks compared to an orca is about the same as a human to a bathtub. Lot’s of room to stretch and move!
  • Wild orcas swim 100+ miles a day, they would have to swim around their tank 1,400+ times a day to achieve that. But that seems like a lot of work, and you may see the animals hanging out near the surface of the water or on the bottoms of their tanks for hours. That’s a lot more relaxing than swimming all those miles!
  • Sea World gives their orcas a Valium-like drug to stop the whales from acting aggressively towards each other and to numb their minds from their vastly uninteresting concrete tanks. Buying a ticket to Sea World is an excellent way to help them pay for these drugs that they pump their animals full with!
  • Many captive orcas show abnormal behaviors like head bobbing, chewing on concrete, and self mutilation by banging their heads into the side of the tank. Obviously just temper-tantrums! Silly things.
  • In the wild, there has been only one orca attack. Bad orca! While in captivity, there have been over 100 attacks and 4 deaths. These animals just need more training, it couldn’t possibly be related to their confinement! 
  • Food is used as reinforcement for tricks. Do a trick, get your dinner. Don’t want to do a trick? I guess you don’t eat tonight you stubborn thing! 

See? Sea World isn’t as bad as people make it out to be! Oh, one more fact: for every $1,000,000 Sea World makes, about $600 goes into conservation efforts (about $0.5 a ticket). I’m so glad they care about conservation of the ocean! Amazing work!

Sources: (x) (x) (x) (x)

If you haven’t realized it yet, this post is 100% sarcastic. It should be obvious, but not everyone understands sarcasm…

Please don’t let this die

Tangina Seaworld / Ocean Adventure / Ocean Park

— 3 days ago with 79262 notes
http://thunderpopcola.tumblr.com/post/97734876590/sometimes-its-okay-to-cut-ties-with-people-it →

thunderpopcola:

Sometimes it’s okay to cut ties with people. It took me a long time to realise that this was okay, to come to terms with the fact that if I didn’t let people leave my life then they’d float about like airships. They’d just be there for no particular reason and we wouldn’t have any kind of…

(Source: pavorst)

— 4 days ago with 280 notes

photojojo:

In the South American country of Bolivia, the Salar de Uyuni salt flat stretches for over 4,000 square miles, making it the largest in the world.

Captivated by the area for years, Japanese photographer Asako Shimizu made her way there in 2006, and captured the unique way in which the sky is reflected on the ground.

The Remarkable Landscape of the Largest Salt Flat in the World

via Slate

— 4 days ago with 2418 notes